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Posts tagged “Canon 1DX III

Up Close & Personal with Grizzly Bears

By day 4 of my trip to Lake Clark Alaska, we were all getting worn out so when we came upon mom and her cub feeding on grass in an open meadow, we decided to lay up against a log on the outside edge of the field and just watch them. Was very relaxing and we loved the opportunity to not shoot but just to chill out and take it all in. We were sitting in a field watching grizzly bears with snowcapped mountains in the background. We weren’t in Kansas (or Houston) anymore Dorthey. Couldn’t get much better than that…until it did!

A male boar entered the field behind mom and she quickly spotted him. She then turned to look at us, foreshadowing her next steps. Mom and her cub quickly got up to check him out. Here is where it got really interesting. As a complete surprise to me, mom started running with her cub directly towards us. That definitely got me to sit up a little straighter against that log and get into the zone while hand holding my 500mm lens.

So, what do you do when a full-size grizzly bear and her cub come running straight at you? Well, #1 you listen to your guide, #2 you don’t run (which could be very detrimental to your health), #3 you keep your cool and photograph the incoming bears or #4 be prepared to change your shorts. Luckily, I followed steps #1 -3.

When they started getting close, couldn’t keep both of them in the frame with my 500mm lens so I automatically switched to focus on the cub.

It happened so quickly that there was no time to think or check/change any camera settings. Was all muscle memory at that point with trying to get part of them in the frame. Would have been nice to have F16 being that close but was happy that I had at least F11 for some depth of field.

Mom got so close at one point that I couldn’t get her whole head in the frame.

The cub walked past us to our left and then looked back towards the boar, giving me a great opportunity for a full frame head shot.

They kept moving off to our left and out into the field. Eventually they made their way towards the mudflats while the male made a slow walk to their previous location to check out her scent. Our guide said that they got about 12 ft from us and were using us for protection as the male would not typically come close to us. One of my favorite unforgettable bear encounters in Alaska.

Taken with Canon 1DX III, Canon 500mm F4 IS II, handheld, uncropped


Alaskan Coastal Brown Bears

Made my first trip to Alaska last week and spent some quality time with the bears at Lake Clark National Park, which was an incredible experience.  Took my waders & ground pod with me as they have a mudflats so got down low and up personal with the bears, especially the cub.

In this photo, mom was standing to look over the tall grass to check for male bears, which will kill the cubs.  She lost 2 cubs last year.  This cub is about 1 ½ yrs old.

1/1600 sec @ F13, ISO 2500, evaluative metering, -1/3 exposure compensation, 560mm, handheld, Canon 100-400 with 1.4X, full frame with no cropping


Snowy Egret with Backlighting

Always love to take back-lit photos at High Island TX rookery and captured this one on Friday

Focused on the snowy’s on this trip as they were in abundance compared to my last visit. Way too many people at the rookery. Got there well before the sun came up and had the last platform by myself. By the time the sun came up, I was sharing the platform with 16 other people. So much for social distancing.

Should have known better than to go on Good Friday but the weather was too good to pass up a sunny morning and some back-lit images.

1/1600 @ F8, ISO 800, evaluative metering, -2/3 exposure compensation, 500mm from tripod.


Playing with the Sun

My favorite part of wildlife photography is playing with the light. In this case, I was playing with the sun.

This is a great egret at High Island TX rookery. Got there well before sunrise and was taking silhouette photos before the sun came up. Kept track of where the sun was going to rise to optimize my chances of playing with the sun and one of the egrets. This one cooperated while standing in some branches. She moved to the right and displayed her breeding plumage just at the right time.

Taken with Canon 1DX III with 500mm F4 IS II mounted on tripod with Wimberley II gimbal head.

1/3200 sec @ F8, ISO 1600, evaluative metering, +1/3 exposure compensation, 500mm

1/8000 sec @ F8, ISO 1600, evaluative metering, -1 exposure compensation, 500mm

1/8000 sec @ F8, ISO 1600, evaluative metering, no exposure compensation, 500mm


One With the Flock

Have to share some details and photos about my unique adventure on Sunday (3/7/21) at Bolivar Flats Audubon Shorebird Sanctuary on the Texas gulf coast in search of American Avocets.  Needless to say, I found just a few. 

While walking along the beach as the sun came up, there were a couple of flocks of avocets off shore but they wouldn’t have been worth the effort to photograph so decided to keep going to see what was around the corner.  Found a group of white pelicans with some avocets feeding around them.  Took the first photo with handholding my rig with ground pod/Wimberley head attached while deciding where to lay down. 

The avocets were working their way to my right but couldn’t get upstream without spooking them so decided to lay down in the opposite direction in anticipation that they would eventually move that way.  Laid down at the water’s edge of a sandbar and focused on flight shots as more and more avocets were coming in to join what soon became a feeding frenzy.

The enlarging flock eventually reversed course and headed in my direction.  During that time, the tide was starting to come in and my sandbar ended up under water and I felt water getting into my waders.  At 53 deg F air temp, 15 to 20 mph winds and 59 deg water temperature, it got really cold really fast.  Tried to back up a few feet to find dry ground but looked behind me and there was no sandbar in site for over 50 ft.

With a flock of several hundred avocets heading my way, had to make the decision to get up to save my frozen body parts or grin and bare it.  As my ground pod filled with water, figured that it couldn’t get much worse so stayed put as the flock was nearly upon me.  When avocets feed, they put their head in the water and use their long bills to rake across the sand to find invertebrates.  They just kept feeding and getting closer and closer. 

Eventually they were within 20 ft of me and just moved around me and kept feeding.  Was very cool to be surrounded 360 deg. by one of my favorite birds.  Don’t know if it helped but I was in full camo with the hood of my sweatshirt pulled over my head.  One of the major advantages of photography using a ground pod is that the birds don’t recognize you as a person.

At this point, I became “one with the flock”, which was an amazing experience.  I’ve had avocets all around me before but it was a handful, not a full flock.  Got a couple of photos that may be photo contest worthy but would have loved this experience if I didn’t get any photos. 

It was challenging to photograph them that close as I couldn’t shift my position without moving too much in fear of spooking them.  Eventually switched to F16 for more depth of field but it didn’t help much at that distance.  The white pelicans also joined the fray and flew about 10 ft over me with one landing very close.  Slowly rotated my ground pod around to get a couple of shots of him.

Was so focused and in the zone that I didn’t realize my ground pod was floating in the water and had shifted so that the back end was down into the sand under the water with the front end up resting on the bottom of my 500mm lens.  With my gimbal head adjustments being loose for shooting, it just floated up in the water.  Pulled it back down and locked it into place for a few seconds to stabilize it when I realized that the salt water was lapping at the bottom of my camera.  Shifted the camera up slightly to get it out of the water and then my lens raincoat was in the water. 

Didn’t take a rocket scientist to say it was time to get up quickly, which was easier said than done with my waders/clothing full of water and my desire to not dunk my gear.  Usually grab the base of my ground pod to help get up but in this case, didn’t want to move/splash my camera/lens so got up next to my gear as water poured out of my jacket.  Slowly made my way back to my car while water was squishing in my wader boots.  Water just poured out of my waders when taking them off.  Removed my camera raincoat and put my camera in the passenger seat for the drive back to the ferry. 

After getting on the ferry, noticed that there was water dripping out of my lens hood.  Removed the hood and saw that the bottom part had been in the water.  Took off the Lenscoat neoprene covers on my lens to dry it off.  Took a couple of hours to clean up myself and my gear but was well worth it.

All photos were taken with Canon 1DXIII, Canon 500mm F4 IS II with 1.4X III, Skimmer ground pod (now a designated floaty) with Wimberley II gimbal head.


Bathing Willet

I always get excited when seeing shorebirds take a bath as they almost always jump up and flap their wings to dry off. Usually a good chance for a great photo op.

Took these shots a couple of weeks ago at Bolivar Flats Audubon shorebird sanctuary along the Texas gulf coast. Cranked the ISO up to 3200 to get a decent shutter speed to freeze the action.

Taken with Canon 1DX III and Canon 500mm F4 IS II with 1.4X III teleconverter mounted on Skimmer ground pod with Wimberley II gimbal head

1/2500 sec @ F8, ISO 3200, evaluative metering, +1 exposure compensation

1/2000 sec @ F8, ISO 3200, evaluative metering, +1 exposure compensation